It’s time for comfort food in Minnesota …

As everyone knows, spring is not making an appearance this year – or so it seems. Once again, the weather forecast for the weekend is snow … and more snow … blizzrd weather.
So, we must turn to comfort food to get us through the weekend.  Why is it called comfort food?  According to many internet sources, comfort food provides consolation or a feeling of well-being. It typically has a high carb or sugar content. Often it is something you mother or grandmother used to make – good old-fashioned home cooking. Do you have a favorite comfort food?
Our choice for comfort food today — Ham and Bean Soup – a very easy choice. You can make a crock pot full or enough for one – simply by adjusting the ingredients.
Ingredients
Chopped/cubed ham (and the bone from a ham if you have one; it gives the broth much better flavor.)
Chopped celery
Chopped onion
Cubed or sliced potatoes
Carrots – either canned or chopped
Canned great northern beans (or white beans of your choice), rinsed
Salt and pepper to taste
Adjust quantities of ingredients depending on how many you want to serve. Don’t worry if  you make too much. It’s just as good the next day. You can also freeze it and heat it up on another comfort food day.
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Ham and Bean Soup prepared by Chef James. 

Before serving, remove the ham bone, clean off the meat remaining on the ham bone, and add it to the soup. Ham broth isn’t very flavorful so the longer it cooks, the better the flavor. You can also add beef broth for flavor.
Tips:
  • If you like, you can add Kitchen Bouquet to give the soup a brownish-color. It does not change the flavor.
  • You can cook all of the vegetables in the microwave for a minute or two (just until softened)  so that it doesn’t take so long for them to cook – or you can just put them in the crock pot and let them cook all day. The longer the soup cooks, the better it tastes.
  • Rinsing the beans removes the starch, sugar and salt from the beans. If you don’t rinse the beans before you put them in the soup, the soup will be thicker and the starch may change the flavor a bit. The choice is yours.
Thanks for reading!! I hope you return again!! 
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Creating memories … Remy and his ham

My recent blog post on family food favorites mentioned a story about grandson Remy and ham. Well, Remy and his younger brother Ollie, visited yesterday  – and ham played a role — so the time is right to tell the story.

Ten years ago, we were preparing to go to our son’s house in Silver Bay for dinner on Christmas day. As often happens, I spend the holiday season shopping and getting ready, and then I am worn out or sick by the time the holiday arrives. That year it was my lung disease acting up and joint pain. (Little did I know that I would have my first heart stents less than a year later.)  I could barely walk and had to sit on a pillow to ride anywhere.

But things weren’t normal at our son’s house, either. You see, they were expecting a baby – and the baby decided that Christmas Eve day was a good day to enter this world. There wouldn’t be much cooking done at their house. They were busy bringing a baby home. And ‘Dad’ was busy taking care of the three kids at home.

So, we improvised. We bought a ham, some buns, Old Dutch potato chips (a long-time family favorite) and a gallon of milk (a family staple) and headed for Silver Bay on Christmas Day.

When we arrived, there was much excitement about the new baby. Little Remy looked a little overwhelmed. Then Grandpa handed him the ham – which he could barely hold – and said: “Look what I brought you.” A big grin spread across Remy’s face. And he took Grandpa’s word literally. It was his ham – which he pronounced h-ahhh-m. Remy proudly showed his Mom the ham. After a little persuasion, he agreed we could cook it for dinner. It was soon clear that Remy loves h-ahhh-m.

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From that time forward, we take a ham to Remy every time we visit. A few times we forgot to get a ham and had to stop at the last minute, usually somewhere along the  North Shore. But every time Grandpa gives him a ham, we get that big Remy grin. It is the best!

Sometimes they cook the ham for the meal and sometimes it goes in their refrigerator or freezer. We also keep the tradition going by making sure we have ham when we have family gatherings at our house.

What did the boys get to eat at our house yesterday? Ham, of course, and they ate a lot.

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Now, this may seem like a fun little story but why do I tell it to you? It’s just this – it is important to plan for details so you make enduring memories. Sometimes the small things are the most memorable – and they don’t take a lot of extra time or effort.

For more on how to create quality memories, I suggest reading The Power of Moments by Chip Heath and Dan Heath. This book provides ways to turn ordinary moments into extraordinary moments – in other words, to enhance memories. The Heaths did not ask me to mention them; I doubt they will even know. I just happen to be a big fan of their books. I think I have all of them. This book, which is relatively recent (released Fall 2017), captures the way I approach events – whether a quick lunch or a public meeting. I am glad someone put this concept into words — although the Heath brothers do a much better job explaining the concept.

Thanks for reading!! I hope you will return!!