A tour of Amish country – Long Prairie and points north and west

Part of the reason for our day trip route a few weeks ago was to look for Amish buildings. We love looking for them – because often the Amish will also have a home store or stand where we can buy baked goods or other hand-crafted or home-grown items. This trip did not fail us; we bought bread, pie, and candy. All healthy and all tasted wonderful.

This blog contains bits of Amish life – buildings, work, and transportation.

First we have photos of Amish homes. Note the large size of the homes with additions — all painted white. Out buildings are often painted red.

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Below is a schoolhouse – small and serviceable to a rural neighborhood.

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And an outbuilding –

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Below is an Amish-run sawmill. It looks like they have been busy.

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And then there is farming and haying  …

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And finally, there is the preferred mode of transportation …

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And the end of the day …

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And there you have a quick glimpse of Amish life.

Thanks for reading. I hope you return. 

Other of my posts about Amish:

https://carolynlbraun.com/2015/09/15/eating-a-haystack/

https://carolynlbraun.com/2015/11/14/another-amish-haystack-dinner-fun-as-always/

 

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Beautiful old buildings … a mix

This blog is part 2 of the old or abandoned building focus of our recent road trip. This time I am featuring a variety of structures – all majestic in their own way; all containing stories from the past. If only we could hear those stories …

As in the last blog, because we visited so many cities and wondered from here to there, I really have no recollection of the exact location of these buildings. They are west and north of St. Cloud – somewhere.

Snuggled somewhere along the route, and tucked back in the trees, is this beautiful rural church.

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In one of the small towns, we found this mostly abandoned feed mill. The building takes up a large area next to the railroad tracks. Just think of all of the people who worked here and the stories they could tell.

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DSC02118bJPGa.jpgAs is common in many of the small towns, we founded this boarded up at-one-time retail building Sadly, the buildings eyes (windows) are now shut to the outside world (they are boarded up). Do you see anyone peeking out of the upper windows?

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This town hall sits out in the open. As you can see, it is fully complaint with ADA (the American Disabilities Act) handicap-accessibility requirements. It looks a little forlorn with no trees or other vegetation but buildings such as these have served townships well for many years.

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This retail space was converted for use as an historical society – a perfect reuse. Note the mural on the right side of the building – a nice touch.

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This last picture is my favorite – an abandoned – or not – outhouse — one with character and charm – in a perfect setting. It has a bit of a Halloween look to it – with eyes (windows) that are shut (or are they?), a doorknob as the nose, and no mouth – leaving you to wonder. Can you imagine the stories this little building could tell? Would you be willing to go inside? (No, I did not. I took the picture from the road. I must admit, however, that I thought about it.)

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Thanks for reading! I hope you return.

Next time: An abandoned homestead – almost.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The mystique of old buildings … barns

One of the purposes – other than to be in air conditioning – of our recent day trip was to look for old buildings. I am fascinated by them. If only we knew the stories they could tell.

We traveled through the countryside west and north of St. Cloud, Minnesota. This area is quite rural with numerous farmsteads. Many of the ‘out-buildings’ (often called accessory buildings, such as barns and sheds) are in a state of decay. Still, there is a sense of beauty in their sagging roofs, open spaces and missing boards.

I must note that I really  have no idea – other than very generally – where these buildings are located.

This building appears to be mostly empty. Note the small window in the center – perhaps looking out from a loft area. Imagine children playing in that loft – hiding from the outside world, telling stories and having fun. Imagine a tractor or other farm equipment parked in the end bays. 

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The barn below appears to still function. While weathered and worn, with only hints of its previous red glory, the barn stands tall, straight and majestic. 

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The barn and silo below have seen there last useful days. Now lying in a pile of rubble, they unfortunately reflect the status of many rural barns. 

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The barn below, though tattered and torn, is standing tall – as are the other out-buildings and still functions for farming purposes. 

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My next blog will feature an abandoned farmstead.

 

Related blogs: 

https://carolynlbraun.com/2016/08/22/a-peek-through-time-continued/

https://carolynlbraun.com/2016/05/19/a-peek-through-time-the-mystique-of-abandoned-homes/

Thanks for reading. I hope you will return.